Green Pozole with Chicken Recipe

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Pozole verde de pollo Green Pozole with Chicken

What better way to celebrate Mexican Independence Day than with a beloved Mexican dish like Green Pozole with Chicken? In Mexico, there are various types of pozole- red, green, white, chicken, beef, pork- just to name a few.

RELATED POST: Authentic Traditional Red Pozole

Green pozole with chicken is my favorite. It’s both easy to make and delicious, so I would like to share my recipe with you.

Green Pozole with Chicken (Pozole Verde de Pollo)

12-16 portions

RELATED POST: 25 Delicious Cinco de Mayo Party Ideas

  • 1 can of hominy 108 oz (3.06 Kg)
  • 1 whole chicken
  • 2 garlic heads +4 garlic cloves, divided
  • 2 Tbsp salt
  • 2 pounds tomatillos (find these at the Mexican market and even in some general markets now. See photo below)
  • 2 1/2 medium white onions, divided
  • 1-3 Serrano peppers (stems removed)
  • 2 bunches of cilantro
  • 1/3 cup of pepitas (optional, ask at your local Mexican market)
  • Up to 2 cups of water
  • 1 iceberg lettuce head
  • 1 bunch radishes
  • 2 avocados
  • 8-10 limes
  • Dry oregano leaves
  • 1-2 pack tostadas

Open the can of hominy and rinse well in a colander until the water is clear.  Place the hominy in your largest pot, considering the hominy and the whole chicken are going to need to fit.  If you don’t have a large enough pot, split everything in half and place into two pots.

Clean and cut the chicken into 4 pieces and place it all in the pot with the hominy. Take the two garlic heads whole, rinse them and throw them in the pot, too.  Lastly, put water in the pot until it covers everything so far. Bring it to boil and then lower the temperature to medium and let it simmer for 45-55 minutes or until the chicken is cooked.

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Take the chicken out of the soup and let it cool. In the meantime, prepare the salsa: You may need to do this part in batches, unless you have an industrial blender.  In a blender, mix well the 4 cloves of peeled garlic, half an onion, two pounds of tomatillos (peeled and wash), serrano chiles (to taste, one for flavor, two for heat), cilantro and pepitas. Add up to two cups of water in order to blend smoothly.

Add the salsa to the soup pot with the hominy and let it simmer for 15-20 minutes on low heat until the salsa changes in color from bright green to olive green. Add salt and test for taste.  The soup is ready to serve.

RELATED POST: Salsa Verde Recipe

While the broth is simmering with the salsa, shred the cooked chicken by hand.  At this point, you have two options, either add the shredded chicken straight to the pot or keep the chicken separate and add a little bit to each bowl as you serve it to make sure everyone who wants some gets some.

Serving the Pozole

Wash the lettuce and finely chop. Wash and finely slice the radishes and chop the remaining onions. Slice the avocados and cut the limes into halves.

Serve the soup in a traditional ceramic pozole dish, or a bowl, adding some shredded chicken, lettuce, radishes, chopped onion, avocado, a pinch of dry oregano, and lime juice.

Accompany with tostadas (by tostadas, I mean fried tortillas, you can get them at Mexican markets or check the Hispanic Food aisle at your store)

Buen Provecho!

Print the recipe below.

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5 from 5 votes
Pozole verde de pollo - mamalatinatips.com
Green Pozole with Chicken
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
1 hr 20 mins
Total Time
1 hr 30 mins
 
Course: Mexican Classics
Cuisine: Mexican
Servings: 16 porciones
Ingredients
  • 1 can of hominy 108 oz 3.06 Kg
  • 1 whole chicken
  • 2 garlic heads +4 garlic cloves divided
  • 2 Tbsp salt
  • 2 pounds tomatillos find these at the Mexican market and even in some general markets now. See photo below
  • 2 1/2 medium white onions divided
  • 1-3 Serrano peppers stems removed
  • 2 bunches of cilantro
  • 1/3 cup of pepitas optional, ask at your local Mexican market
  • Up to 2 cups of water
  • 1 iceberg lettuce head
  • 1 bunch radishes
  • 2 avocados
  • 8-10 limes
  • Dry oregano leaves
  • 1-2 pack tostadas
Instructions
  1. Open the can of hominy and rinse well in a colander until the water is clear. Place the hominy in your largest pot, considering the hominy and the whole chicken are going to need to fit. If you don’t have a large enough pot, split everything in half and place into two pots.

  2. Clean and cut the chicken into 4 pieces and place it all in the pot with the hominy. Take the two garlic heads whole, rinse them and throw them in the pot, too. Lastly, put water in the pot until it covers everything so far. Bring it to boil and then lower the temperature to medium and let it simmer for 45-55 minutes or until the chicken is cooked.

  3. Take the chicken out of the soup and let it cool. In the meantime, prepare the salsa: You may need to do this part in batches, unless you have an industrial blender. In a blender, mix well the 4 cloves of peeled garlic, half an onion, two pounds of tomatillos (peeled and wash), serrano chiles (to taste, one for flavor, two for heat), cilantro and pepitas. Add up to two cups of water in order to blend smoothly.

  4. Add the salsa to the soup pot with the hominy and let it simmer for 15-20 minutes on low heat until the salsa changes in color from bright green to olive green. Add salt and test for taste. The soup is ready to serve.

  5. While the broth is simmering with the salsa, shred the cooked chicken by hand. At this point, you have two options, either add the shredded chicken straight to the pot or keep the chicken separate and add a little bit to each bowl as you serve it to make sure everyone who wants some gets some.

Serving the Pozole
  1. Wash the lettuce and finely chop. Wash and finely slice the radishes and chop the remaining onions. Slice the avocados and cut the limes into halves.

  2. Serve the soup in a traditional ceramic pozole dish, or a bowl, adding some shredded chicken, lettuce, radishes, chopped onion, avocado, a pinch of dry oregano, and lime juice.

  3. Accompany with tostadas (by tostadas, I mean fried tortillas, you can get them at Mexican markets or check the Hispanic Food aisle at your store)

Recipe Notes

Pozole freezes well. Keep it in a hermetic seal container and freeze up to 3 months.

©Mama Latina Tips Media

www.mamalatinatips.com

This green pozole with chicken recipe is exactly like we made it at home in Mexico when I was growing up. A delightful combination of chicken, tomatillos, cilantro, garlic & spices. Photos and step by step instructions included.

95 thoughts on “Green Pozole with Chicken Recipe

    • Jessica, thank you for your comment. Yes, you leave the whole head unpeeled, so that you can remove it easily before you serve the pozole. Enjoy!

    • Hello Nancy,

      The recipe calls for chicken, but you can use any kind of meat for any kind of pozole. Green pozole is usually made with chicken, red pozole is usually made with beef or pork.

  1. It very simple to follow the recipe and it came out delicious! My family thinks it is the best pozole I have ever made. Thank you 🙂

  2. Will try for the first time this date. Had this @ a friends home & it was just delicious. Hopefully my batch will be as delicious.

    .

  3. Hi.. If I’m making for 20 how much do I use?
    Does the chicken have to be whole? Or can I do breasts
    With the bone too? Thanks so much. My family usually
    Only makes red, yours sounds amazing.

    • Hello Desiree, thanks for your comment. For 20, I guess it depends on how much they eat :), but I would make double the recipe so you have plenty. I made this for a party of 12 and a few of them had seconds and a couple had thirds. Pozole freezes extremely well, so if you have leftovers just keep them for a later meal. I use the whole chicken because the bones give the broth lots of flavor, you can do breasts but you need to add plenty of bones to the broth.

  4. Hi! I’m making this over the weekend. So, the whole garlic cloves that are there, do I take those out when I remove the chicken? Then what, discard them or peel and then crush into pozole?

    • Hello Theresa, you discard them. But if you want to peel them and crush into the pozole, that is ok as well, sometimes I do that, too. 🙂

  5. I’m going to make this finally tomorrow. It looks so delicious my husband doesn’t eat pork so I’m so excited to have him try this posole. Thanks for this easy recipe!

  6. Thank you Silvia for this wonderful recipe, I used pork instead of chicken and it was great. I made it for our Sunday night family dinner and everyone loved it. Do you also have a recipe for the red pozole?

  7. Awesome! Easy and was way tasty the only thing i would do different is i would add little amounts if water to the tomatillos. Otherwise it was easy and very good.

    • Hello Gina, thank you for your comment. Your question is a good one. While we use half for the salsa, the rest is chopped to serve on top of the pozole once served, along with the fresh lettuce, avocado, oregano, etc. Since the recipe serves 12-16 we need to have plenty of onion. I hope this helps.

  8. Silvia, this was a delish recipe! I usually call on my sister n law when my husband is asking for pozole, but she was busy last night. So I googled it an your site came up. Thank you! It was an easy recipe to follow and yummy! Not only did my husband eat two bowls or dinner he took left overs for lunch. Do you have a recipe for a red pozole?

    • Hi Carrie, thank you so much for your comment! My husband says he could eat it every day. I’m pretty sure he means it as a compliment, although I guess it could mean he doesn’t like any of the rest of my food. As for the red pozole, yes, I do have a recipe, but it is still on my list to make and publish. I wish I could say when that will happen, stay tuned and thanks again.

  9. Hi,

    Quick question can we opt to not use the chicken? I have a vegetarian and would like to know if the flavor would be the same if I omit the chicken. Thank you for your advice in advance.

    • Hello Kina, the flavor will be definitely different but that doesn’t mean you cannot make a vegetarian pozole, thanks for the idea. I will try and share!

  10. I will definitely try this! My aunt made it with your recipe and it was delicious! But I do have one question regarding the salt. Is the 2 tbsp normally enough? I always seem to over do it with the salt

    • Hello Bibianna, in my experience is better to add a little salt than too much. You can always add extra in your plate if you think it needs a little bit more. In my experience the 2 T are enough.

  11. I make the chile for my pork or chicken chile con carne in a very similar manner. My question is regarding the hominy. What kind do you use and does cooking it that long make it too mushy or over cooked since it’s already cooked out of the can? Also, I’ve never used pepitas in my chile but i love them just to eat alone:) what favor is added using the pepitas and should I toast them before blending them in the chile? Do you have a recipe for mole pepian? Chile pepian?

  12. Silvia, I seem to recall, always being served Pozole Verde, with an egg dropped in it. I grew up in Arizona, and am wondering, is this possibly a regional thing?.

    • Hi Tim, it may be since I have never seen that. I have seen different kind of pozole, green, red, white but never with an egg. Have you try it?

  13. Hello I made this call me stupid but I followed the recipe to a tee and it had no flavor I am racking my brain trying to figure out what I did I grew up with a chef mother I do know how to cook but I must have missed something… Feeling frustrated

    • Sorry you feeling frustrated Rhonda. I honestly don’t know what to say, everytime I make it is delicious. Be sure you are adding enough garlic and tons of cilantro.

  14. Well done Sylvia, I consider myself an authentic Mexican cook born in the U.S. but taught bu my mexican born mom. I’m making your recipe today and will let you know how it turns out for me. Truly sounds like a great recipe Thank you!

    • Hello Jeremy,

      Thanks for your comment. 1/2 onion is added to the tomatillos to make the salsa. The rest of the onion is chopped and served in a bowl for your guests to spoon on top of their bowls as desired when you serve it.

  15. Hi, this recipe looks great, I have all ingredients and am ready to make it. I got dried hominy instead of canned. How should I alter the recipe? Just soak the hominy and stick to the same cooking directions?

    • Hi Aisha, thank you for your kind words and your comment. I have never used dried hominy for this recipe, so I’m just guessing here. I would follow the instructions on the package to cook it first. I’m certain that you will want to rinse it well, then soak it well, a few hours or overnight. Then change the water again before you cook it, then stick to the cooking directions on the package. You’ll want to make sure that the hominy is just slightly soft to the touch before adding it to the broth. Please let me know how that works for you. Good luck! and thank you.

    • Hi Stacy, thank you for your comment. I think the best answer to this is to look for a smaller can of hominy, then use half of the rest of the ingredients. You will still have some extra, but pozole freezes really well, so you can have another yummy meal for later. Also, guests usually have seconds, so there may not be that much left over.

  16. Just made this today…and it was goooooood!
    I used the chicken breast with bones. Put 4 seranos (next time I’ll put 8) and put the smashed garlic back in.

    • Thanks for letting us know Gabriel! I usually make a very spicy salsa on the side for the people in my family who love extra spicy food.

  17. Hi! I think this is the soup I had at a Hispanic Heritage luncheon not long ago. It was one of the most delicious soups I’ve had so I hope I can recreate it. At the luncheon they put a green salsa/sauce on top. I ‘m assuming that’s where the soup got it’s kick from. You have the salsa cooked with the soup which is wonderful for me but not necessarily so for my kids. Can you have the salsa on the side? What would you do differently to it if you did?

    Thanks so much!!

    • Hi Debbie, thanks so much for your comment. I think a lot of people have the same question. What I suggest is skipping the serrano peppers and just blending the tomatillos with the onion, garlic, salt and cilantro, so the pozole will still cook with the (no pepper) sauce and get all the flavorful goodness from the tomatillos, cilantro and the rest. Then, prepare salsa verde with the peppers in case you or other family members would like to add a little kick at meal time. Here is the recipe https://www.mamalatinatips.com/2013/01/salsa-verde-recipe.html Thanks again for your question.

  18. Thank you for this delicious recipe, I’ve made it a few times now and my family loves it. The only thing I added was a couple hojas de laurel (dry bay leaves) while the chicken and hominy cooked.

    • Hi Celina, thanks so much for your comment. I’m glad to hear your family loves it. Thanks for the suggestion, I will try it with hojas de laurel next time.

  19. Silvia,
    Una pregunta, para hacer la salsa puedo agregar le un poblano también a la salsa y no ponerle pepitas? También me dijo una vecina que ella pone la salsa a freír después de licuar lo? Estaría bien hacer eso!?

    Gracias

    • Hola Jayda, gracias por tu comentario. Yo le pongo las pepitas la mitad del tiempo y sabe igual de rico. Yo no frío la salsa porque yo la pongo a cocer con el caldo y el caldo ya tiene la grasita del pollo además que es un paso más, pero no pasa nada si lo haces. En cuanto al chile poblano, no lo he intentado, seguro cambiará un poco el sabor pero me imagino que sabrá rico. Si lo haces regresa y cuéntame como te quedo. ¡Saludos!

  20. I personally like the spiciness of the chile de arbol instead of Serrano or jalapeño peppers! Will try all your ingredients with Arbol peppers! I hope it comes out delish!

  21. Hi Silvia,
    Would it be horrible to leave the chicken in with everything, instead of taking it out? (I’d be using drumsticks, breast and thighs, rather than a whole chicken)
    Thank you in advance!

    • Hello Charlene, thanks for your comment, it’s a great question. There are a couple of things: first, I take the chicken out because the hominy needs to cook with the sauce for a long time, and if I leave the chicken in, it will be very overcooked and probably almost “dissolved” in the broth. The second thing is keep in mind that the bones in the chicken are the ones that give the broth a lot of its flavor, so if you use just drumsticks, breast and thighs it may taste a little different, a little less flavorful. I hope this helps. Let me know how things go. Thanks, Silvia

  22. Made this last night, didn’t change anything, and it was amazing! Makes tons so will be freezing the left overs. Thanks for this recipe!!

    • Hello Emily, thanks for letting me know how it turned out. I’m glad you liked it, for us it’s always a winner! It does make a lot!

    • Hi Rachael, thank you for your comment. Yes, I blend the salsa ingredients raw. They will get cooked along with the broth. In this way, both the chicken and the hominy absorb the salsa’s flavor.

    • Hi Lorene,

      Thank you for your comment. In my experience, it doesn’t overpower it, the cilantro actually gives the broth a fantastic flavor. Also, it’s important to consider that this recipe makes a lot of liquid. However, if you are not a big fan of cilantro, you can try using half and then add more at the end according to your taste.

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